10 Job Search Tips for Teens


by Teri Fritsma

Are you a high school or college student who’ll be job hunting this summer? You may face some stiff competition. The recession has hit workers of all ages—but it’s been especially tough on younger workers. Youth ages 16-24 are experiencing the highest rates of unemployment on record. And 16 to 19-year-olds are faring worst of all: in 2009, roughly one out of every four teens who wanted a job could not find one. These are national statistics, but the outlook for Minnesota youth is similar.

 

Why have teens been hit so hard by the recession? For one thing, they’re competing with more experienced workers for a smaller number of jobs. Young workers have traditionally found summer jobs in food service, retail, and other low-paying, high-turnover sectors. Older professionals may look for work in these sectors to make ends meet after a layoff. Rightly or wrongly, employers may believe that an older, more experienced applicant will make a more reliable employee than a teenager. Your job is to present yourself in a way that counteracts these stereotypes.

 

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Making the First Cut – The Prescreening Interview


by Karen Kodzik

Karen Kodzik, a career management consultant and founder of Cultivating Careers, holds a Master’s degree with an emphasis in Career Development and has worked with professionals in transition for over 13 years. She has worked inside of Fortune 500 companies, a global consulting firm, higher education, and a non-profit organization. She has coached and consulted various levels of professionals across industries throughout the country.

 

The prescreening interview has become commonplace in the job market. Understanding the role of the prescreening interview will help you prepare for it, interview well and move on to the next step in the interview process.

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Measuring Minnesota's Green Economy


by Nicholas Dobbins

Nick Dobbins is a Research Analyst for the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. He works with a team of analysts who are studying Minnesota’s green economy.

 

By now, you’ve likely heard the hype about green jobs. People everywhere seem to be talking about how emerging green industries might create good jobs, improve the environment and strengthen the economy. For many Minnesotans, the promise of green jobs is a reason for optimism, both about their own future employment prospects and the health of the planet.

 

But there are many unanswered questions. No one knows how much demand there is for these jobs, the industries they’re in, the types of tasks they involve or the training they require. There isn’t even an official definition of what makes a job green. So where do you find these elusive jobs of the future? Thanks to a $1.2 million federal grant, researchers in the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development’s Labor Market Information office (DEED-LMI) can begin to answer some of these questions. 

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Measuring Minnesota’s Green Economy


by Nicholas Dobbins

Nick Dobbins is a Research Analyst for the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. He works with a team of analysts who are studying Minnesota’s green economy.

 

By now, you’ve likely heard the hype about green jobs. People everywhere seem to be talking about how emerging green industries might create good jobs, improve the environment and strengthen the economy. For many Minnesotans, the promise of green jobs is a reason for optimism, both about their own future employment prospects and the health of the planet.

 

But there are many unanswered questions. No one knows how much demand there is for these jobs, the industries they’re in, the types of tasks they involve or the training they require. There isn’t even an official definition of what makes a job green. So where do you find these elusive jobs of the future? Thanks to a $1.2 million federal grant, researchers in the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development’s Labor Market Information office (DEED-LMI) can begin to answer some of these questions. 

Continue reading