My Skills, My Future


by Rachel Vilsack

Understanding your skills is an important part of the job search process.  Many skills, like time management, critical thinking, and problem-solving, demonstrate how we approach – and do – our work.  We call these transferable skills because they stay with us as we move to a different job or new career.  If you are in job transition, you may be looking for opportunities in a different industry or occupation than you’ve previously worked. No jobs are exactly alike, but many jobs require common skills.  And these might be skills you already possess. 

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Establishing an Online Presence? Post Wisely.


by Tom Melander

Google CEO Eric Schmidt was on Colbert a couple of weeks ago and made a point that bears repeating: once you post something online, it’s out there forever (especially if it’s risqué). Joining online groups and participating in discussions is a great way to get noticed by potential employers. It’s common practice for a company to check out a job candidate online before offering an interview. Some recruiters go further and actively monitor online discussions to find the best and brightest candidates.  Poor posting habits—like writing in bad taste or using bad grammar or spelling—will get you noticed, but for the wrong reasons.

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A View from the Other Side of the Interview Table


by Sharon Boerbon Hanson

Your answers to interview questions tell employers more about you than you might think. Interview questions are designed to evaluate traits, abilities, and skills that the interviewer hasn’t asked directly about.  Understanding what an employer is hoping to discover will help you present yourself in a way that moves you from the interview “firing range” to the “hiring range.” (Note: the advice below uses examples from the field of IT, but the general points apply to any field.)

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Adult Learners Grow in Strength


by Laura Gilbert

Depending on how you count them, adult learners represent anywhere from 48 to 85 percent of students in postsecondary classrooms. Adult degree completion programs, for-profit specialty schools, expanded community college offerings, and online options make it possible for adults of all ages and interests to return to school. But what is motivating multiple generations of learners back to the classroom? What do these learners hope school will do for them?  The four most common reasons are:

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Avoid These Common Interview Tricks, Traps & Pitfalls


by Sharon Boerbon Hanson

Employers are looking for “must haves.” Present yourself as a “must have” by avoiding the tricks, traps, and pitfalls that trip many people up during interviews.  For each question the employer asks, you want to answer in a way that positions you as the most desirable candidate. Read on to see some of the most commonly asked questions. Note: the examples below are from the IT industry—but the general points apply to just about any jobseeker.

 

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Avoid These Common Interview Tricks, Traps & Pitfalls


by Sharon Boerbon Hanson

Employers are looking for “must haves.” Present yourself as a “must have” by avoiding the tricks, traps, and pitfalls that trip many people up during interviews.  For each question the employer asks, you want to answer in a way that positions you as the most desirable candidate. Read on to see some of the most commonly asked questions. Note: the examples below are from the IT industry—but the general points apply to just about any jobseeker.

 

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Education DOES Pay


by Kathy Kirchoff

Everyone wants to make enough money to take care of themselves and their family, and they don’t want to face unemployment. Data from the U.S. Department of Labor shows that as your education increases, your wages are likely to go up and your chances of becoming unemployed go down. While there are never any guarantees in today’s labor market, education is still one of the surest means to a bright future.

 

Here are the statistics. People with less than a high school degree have an average unemployment rate of 14.6 percent, and an average wage of $11.35 per hour. Finishing high school bumps average hourly wages up to $15.65 (or $4.30 more per hour). The average hourly wage for someone with some college but no degree is $17.48, and getting a 2-year or associate’s degree can increase your hourly wage to $19.03, on average. Read more on why and how additional training beyond high school pays off. 

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