Temporary Employment Situations – Part II


by Cameron Macht

Earlier this week a blog post looked at job opportunities in the employment services sector. Eight of the top ten high-demand occupations in that sector require on-the-job training, while just two require a college degree. But according to an in-depth report (pdf) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics on the expanding role of temporary help services, the demand for temporary employees has shifted away from low-skill, low-paying jobs in recent years to more high-skill, high-paying positions. What’s the trend in Minnesota?

 

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Temporary Employment Solutions – Part I


by Cameron Macht

Many employers have responded cautiously to the economic recovery by hiring temporary workers through employment services. These temporary staffing companies can be a quick and flexible solution for a company’s short-term needs, taking care of such time-consuming tasks as posting job announcements, screening applicants, interviewing candidates and placing workers. They may be a good opportunity for job seekers, too.

 

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Ex-Offenders: Prepare for the Tough Interview Questions


by Mark Schultz

Interviewing can be a nerve-wracking experience for anyone. For ex-offenders, though, there is always that nagging thought of “when will I be asked about my criminal background?” and “how am I going to respond?” This can cause unneeded stress throughout the interview process. If you’re an ex-offender, what can you do to help ease the pressure of an interview? The key element is preparation!

 

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The Art of the Interview Follow-Up


by Rachel Vilsack

Many years ago as a first-time job seeker, I applied online for a position with a major employer. I was contacted for a pre-screening telephone interview. I must have passed because the following week I was set up with another telephone interview with a supervisor, and the week after that I had another telephone interview with a department manager. After all this effort – expended on my behalf practicing interview questions and forming questions to ask in return – I didn’t get the job. In fact, I never heard back from the employer. My error: I didn’t follow up.

 

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Do Your Interview Research


by Rachel Vilsack

Recently, a friend of mine had a job interview. She prepared for the interview, confidently reviewed and practiced answers to some common interview questions, and knew the different types of interviews styles that she might encounter. Finally, she did something that would make her as a candidate stand out – she spent time researching the company and the people with whom she would be interviewing.

 

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Turn Age into an Advantage During the Interview


by Rachel Vilsack

Yesterday we covered some common interview questions and how you may want to prepare your answer. Not all interview questions are legal. Employers are prohibited from asking certain personal questions during a job interview. Questions like “are you married?” and “what is your national origin?” are not allowed before a conditional offer of employment. However, employers may legally ask questions that allude to the answers they are interested in, including “are you willing to travel?” and “do you have the legal right to work in the United States?”

 

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Mind Your Interview Q's and A's


Preparing for a job interview is as important as the actual job interview. Consider participating in mock interviews prior to the actual interview. Line up a partner who is frank, candid, yet supportive and positive!  For a meaningful experience, have a specific line of work chosen. Ask your partner for feedback on both what you say (content) and how you say it (non-verbal). Repeated practice helps you perform better at real interviews.

 

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