Deciding on a College


by Rachel Vilsack

Selecting a school is an important step in preparing for college. There are many factors that play a role in which colleges you consider attending. You’ll find a lot of information posted on a school’s web site, but a visit to the campus for a tour or meeting with an admission or financial aid representative can provided invaluable insight.  This is a major life decision, so it’s worth taking the time to do your research!

 

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Paying for School


by Rachel Vilsack

College students and their families rely on money provided by state and federal government, colleges, and private sources to pay for school. While the upfront cost is significant, the payoff can be great. The Pew Research Center estimates that the typical college graduate earns an estimated $650,000 more than the typical high school graduate over the course of a 40-year work life.

 

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If Your Partner is Not Job Hunting


by Paul Sears

If the job hunter in your household is motivated, connected to good resources, and effectively looking for employment, count your blessings! Your job hunter will get a job faster than others will – because they “get it.” Their job right now is to get a job! But when a job hunter is not effectively looking, is not connected to resources, is not motivated, and does little or nothing on their own work search, the family is left out in the cold. For family members this can be an awkward, financially perilous, and scary situation.

 

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Build Trust and the Rest Will Follow


by Mark Anthony Zappa

“A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.”

–The Scout Law

 

My career as a Boy Scout was, frankly, unremarkable. But memorizing the Scout Law has been a great life compass. Looking at it now with fresh eyes (40 plus years later) I see a lot of wisdom packed into those 16 words – even wisdom I can apply to job hunting.

 

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Employers are Hiring


by Oriane Casale

This spring, employers reported a total of 62,950 job openings in Minnesota, a 26 percent increase from last fall. Statewide, there were 2.6 unemployed people for each vacancy, compared to 3.6 the previous year.  This over-the-year decrease in the number of unemployed persons per vacancy is driven both by a decrease in the total number of unemployed and a strong increase in the number of job vacancies from one year ago. These data suggest that although the labor market remains challenging for job seekers, it is beginning to come back into alignment after the recession.

 

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