Disability Employment in Minnesota


by Mohamed Mourssi

Finding and retaining talented, diverse employees is important for businesses to stay competitive. Highly qualified job seekers with disabilities are frequently overlooked and underestimated. Recent reports show that about nine million unemployed Americans with significant disabilities are seeking jobs. Federal, state, and local governments, along with chambers of commerce and nonprofit organizations, are working with people with disabilities to improve their job opportunities and workplace support.

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Big Data on the Job


by Rachel Vilsack

“Big data” refers to data sets so large and complex that traditional database management tools cannot adequately capture, store, or analyze them. While often quantified in exabytes – or one quintillion (a 1 followed by 18 zeros) – big data can also include other media, like videos, pictures, or words.  According to experts, big data will mean big business and require workers who can think big.

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Do You Think Critically When Building Your Network?


by Joe McKenzie

A few months back I wrote an article asking the question, “Do you value your network?” I received a lot of feedback and had numerous discussions with my own network connections as a result of the article. The discussions made me wonder: does the current professional networking environment – and the ease with which someone can accumulate over 500 friends, followers, or contacts on social media – result in a preference for quantity over quality? I have observed first-hand people whose sole focus is quantity in building their networks They may be missing opportunities to create the stronger connections that a smaller, more managable network allows.

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Know Who and What Pushes Your Buttons at Work


by Rachel Vilsack

Are there things or people at work who “push your buttons,” causing you to have a strong emotional reaction? Understanding who (people) and what (situations) push our buttons can help us identify when we’ve been triggered and take some corrective action. This helps us build emotional intelligence on the job, which helps us work better in teams, manage change more effectively, and build trust with coworkers.

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Putting Emotional Intelligence to Work


by Rachel Vilsack

Interpersonal communication and conflict resolution are skills that employers often mention as being desirable for their current and future employees. I often think of this as emotional intelligence, which is the ability to understand emotions – in yourself and others – and to use this information to manage your behavior and relationships. Most of what makes us successful at work and in our relationships is emotional intelligence, not our IQ. On the job, emotional intelligence becomes a powerful tool when working in teams and managing interpersonal issues.

 

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