Are Mentors Still Needed In Today’s Workplace?


by Denise Felder

Career advisers and business leaders agree: Having a mentor is an important and effective way to increase your career success.

Students and new professionals in all fields are encouraged to find an experienced manager or employee to give them advice and guide them in their professional journeys.

“Mentors have not only taught me about what is important (both personally and professionally); they have also given me several big breaks,” startup founder Chris Myers said on Forbes.com.

Forbes Magazine is not the only influential outlet to promote professional mentoring.

HuffPost touts the Importance of Mentorship. And Inc. Magazine lists 10 Reasons Why a Mentor is a Must.

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Photo by Andrew Robles

A quick Google search uncovers thousands (literally) more examples of business consultants and career coaches telling job seekers and employees new in the United States workplace why and how to find a mentor.

The majority of the business people giving this advice are Baby Boomers or Generation Xers who place a high value on the opinions and knowledge of older, more experienced people.

The mentoring relationship they are promoting is also well suited for the “traditional” corporate office workplace. Today’s workplace is not the same as it was in the 1980s and 1990s. The economy, the workforce, and business structures has changed.

Has the need for professional mentoring relationships changed, too? Or do potential mentors and would-be protégés simply need to redefine leadership development?

Think about how your culture affects your views of mentoring.

How might professional mentoring relationships be perceived by immigrant students and new employees from countries other than the United States?

What about generational differences? How might age affect the goals and expectations of a mentoring relationship?

In today’s evolving workplace, is mentoring still needed? If so, what does a successful professional mentoring relationship look like?

Share your thoughts and experiences with us.

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Top 5 Reasons YOU Should Be at the 2016 Minnesota CTE Works! Summit


1. Sharpen the Saw

Sometimes you have to take a break from the “work” of your work to sharpen your skills. A dull axe won’t cut a tree nearly as effectively as a sharp one. Spend one day learning from your peers about innovations in the classroom and workforce development practices.

2. New Tools

Companies often have tools to display that we haven’t seen yet. Technology that make us more efficient, better positioned to make informed decisions, or give us some other sort of edge. Explore the Technology Gallery Walk to learn about quality online and other technology tools for teaching and career exploration.

3. Learn in a New Space

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OHE Offers Loan Repayments To Curb Teacher Shortage


Minnesota schools are experiencing a teacher shortage in several critical areas.

teacherAccording to Education Minnesota, the hardest positions to fill are in special education, math and science. There is also a need for more teachers to lead Career and Technical Education classes in high schools.

The state also has low numbers of teachers of color compared to Minnesota’s diverse student bodies.

Qualified teachers can apply for financial incentives to work in classrooms. The Minnesota Office of Higher Education announced The Minnesota Teacher Shortage Student Loan Repayment Program. Created in 2015 by the State Legislature, and signed into law by Governor Dayton, the program is intended to encourage teachers to teach in designated Minnesotan shortage areas.

According to OHE, Qualifying teachers who apply by June 30, 2016 may be eligible for repayment assistance of $1,000 per year, up to a total of $5,000. OHE estimates that 194 awards will be made for the 2015-2016 award year, with as many as 1,940 annual awards made through 2019.

Teachers can apply for the loan repayment program who:

  • Hold a teaching license issued by the licensing division in the Minnesota Department of Education on behalf of the Board of Teaching
  • Are employed by a school district to provide classroom instruction
  • Teach in a designated teacher shortage area; and
  • Have outstanding qualified educational loan debt.

More Information:

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The Almost Graduate: Part III of an Adult Learner's Back-to-School Journey


by Jared Reise~

Two and a half years ago, I was contemplating going back to school for the first time in a long time.

After I started my education journey, I dished out advice at the midway point of my studies.

Today, I can say that I have successfully completed the Minneapolis Community & Technical College’s Screenwriting track in Cinema Studies.  I’m a step closer to my associate degree.

There’s still more to come for me. And you can start or redirect your own back-to-school journey.

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Sen. Franken Tackles Skills Gap During MN College Visit


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Minnesota Senator Al Franken toured Minnesota State Community and Technical College in Moorhead last week.  The college showcased its programs that pair students with local industry for work-based learning.  Senator Franken acknowledged that what MSCTC and other community colleges are doing to connect student learning with employer needs is working.

The Senator’s visit gave him the opportunity to talk about his proposed legislation called the “Community College to Career Fund Act.” It would create a competitive grant program supporting partnerships between community colleges and local businesses.  This funding opportunity aims to eliminate the skills gap between job candidates and industry needs.

Read more about the Senator’s visit to MSCTC from Agweek.

 

Featured image courtesy Craig Willford through Creative Commons 2.0

MnSCU’s Anderson Celebrates Mentors and Career & Technical Education


Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton is one of many state and national leaders to recognize February 2016 as Career and Technical Education Month. The acknowledgement of secondary and postsecondary Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs by the governor, the U.S. Senate and others serves as a reminder of the important work our educators do everyday to help students succeed in their college and career goals.

Ron_Anderson_FinalWith that in mind, Minnesota CTE took the opportunity to ask Ron Anderson, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs at the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU), to reflect on CTE’s contributions to the state. Anderson speaks about the success of MnSCU’s CTE students, remembers his mentors, and talks about the role CTE plays in our states education and economic systems.

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