Uncover the Hidden Job Market


by Rachel Vilsack

Many employers find workers without posting a job online. In fact, it’s often estimated that 80 percent (or more) or jobs are never advertised. This is called the hidden job market. The term “hidden” doesn’t mean the jobs are necessarily a secret or that the employer doesn’t want you to know they have an opening. But it does mean that if your search strategy is to only check online job boards, you may be missing out.

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Do You Think Critically When Building Your Network?


by Joe McKenzie

A few months back I wrote an article asking the question, “Do you value your network?” I received a lot of feedback and had numerous discussions with my own network connections as a result of the article. The discussions made me wonder: does the current professional networking environment – and the ease with which someone can accumulate over 500 friends, followers, or contacts on social media – result in a preference for quantity over quality? I have observed first-hand people whose sole focus is quantity in building their networks They may be missing opportunities to create the stronger connections that a smaller, more managable network allows.

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Job Advice for New College Graduates


by Rachel Vilsack

Recent reports on college graduates’ prospects in the job market are grim. Unemployment and underemployment of graduates rose during the Great Recession and continue to remain high. In 2012, Minnesota teens and young adults had the highest unemployment rates at 18.6 percent for teens (age 16 to 19) and 7.7 percent for young adults (age 20 to 24) according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics analysis (pdf).

 

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Be a Smarter, More Effective Job Seeker


by Heather Isaacs

Often when I facilitate workshops at the St. Paul WorkForce Center, I’ll introduce myself as a “professional job seeker,” because I’ve changed jobs many times over the years between layoffs and planned moves. All of this practical experience keeps me current in sharing with job seekers what works in getting a job. In this post I want to discuss the two most important concepts I’ve learned: how to network and how to target a job search.

 

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Networking: By The Seasons


by Rachel Vilsack

Networking is important part of the job search process.  It can help you learn inside information about jobs that are being created or not advertised.  Everybody networks — at school, church, social activities, work, and online. Remember that networking is not the same as asking for a job, so you can do it anywhere. Usually your networking contacts will not be potential employers, but the connections you make with others with shared interests just might lead to an opportunity tomorrow. Since it’s starting to feel like spring – and soon summer – it made me think: what are some examples of Spring and Summer networking opportunities?

 

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Raising the Curtain on the Hidden Job Market


by Rachel Vilsack

It’s frequently reported that the majority (70 to 80 percent) of job openings are never advertised by employers. This is referred to as the hidden job market, suggesting that these jobs would be “hidden” from a job seeker who is only looking for opportunities posted online or in printed help-wanted ads. These figures are often cited as a reason why job seekers should engage in networking activities. But what evidence is there on how many job openings in the Twin Cities labor market are not posted online? To answer this question, we can compare the number of job openings with the number of new hires at firms.

 

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