2 Years, 1 Occupation, and a Good Wage in the Northeast


by Eric White~

 

Community colleges have been making headlines recently with President Obama proposing free tuition for responsible students.

Even if that doesn’t happen, students will find that community colleges cost less than 4-year universities. Less credits will be required to graduate with a degree, and still lead to rewarding and well-paying jobs.

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Better Data on High-School-to-College-Transitions with SLEDS


by Rachel Vilsak ~

How many students at public Minnesota high schools are prepared for postsecondary education? Do these students attend college? If so, do they complete a certificate or degree?

Data to answer questions such as these will play a key role in informing Minnesotans about how students are doing, and direct efforts to open up higher education opportunities for everyone.

The good news is, Minnesota has developed a data system to answer these questions. Continue reading

Education Pays


by Rachel Vilsack

Each year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) produces a chart showing median weekly earnings and unemployment rates by level of education. The trend is always the same: as your educational level increases your wages are likely to grow and your chances of being unemployed declines. But for college bound students or recent college graduates, does it matter what you study?

 

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Job Advice for New College Graduates


by Rachel Vilsack

Recent reports on college graduates’ prospects in the job market are grim. Unemployment and underemployment of graduates rose during the Great Recession and continue to remain high. In 2012, Minnesota teens and young adults had the highest unemployment rates at 18.6 percent for teens (age 16 to 19) and 7.7 percent for young adults (age 20 to 24) according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics analysis (pdf).

 

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Deciding on a College


by Rachel Vilsack

Selecting a school is an important step in preparing for college. There are many factors that play a role in which colleges you consider attending. You’ll find a lot of information posted on a school’s web site, but a visit to the campus for a tour or meeting with an admission or financial aid representative can provided invaluable insight.  This is a major life decision, so it’s worth taking the time to do your research!

 

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Paying for School


by Rachel Vilsack

College students and their families rely on money provided by state and federal government, colleges, and private sources to pay for school. While the upfront cost is significant, the payoff can be great. The Pew Research Center estimates that the typical college graduate earns an estimated $650,000 more than the typical high school graduate over the course of a 40-year work life.

 

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Save Time and Money on the Way to a Degree


by Jamie Buss

Last month, this blog announced a new national website to explore health care careers – the Virtual Career Network.  But you don’t have to be interested in health care to benefit from this site. In fact, one of its unique features is a Prior Learning Assessment aimed at helping adults with several years of workforce experience qualify for some college credit based on learning they have already done. Getting college credit for prior learning is a great way to save time and money while you’re earning a degree or certificate.

 

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