83 Cents


by Teri Fritsma

In Minnesota, women earn 83 cents for every dollar that men earn, on average. That’s called the pay gap. To look at this a different way, the average woman would have to work almost ten years longer than the average man to equal his salary over the course of a career. Research has identified many reasons for the gap that go well beyond simple discrimination, but even after all  legitimate sources of male/female pay differences (like education level, experience, work hours, skill differences, etc.) are accounted for, there is still a gap.

 

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What Women Really Want: Better Work Opportunities


by Kathy Kirchoff

Are you looking for a job that fits your life and work needs, offers advancement opportunities and better pay? Then you need to match your interests and goals to Minnesota’s high-paying and in demand jobs, many of which offer the career advancement you desire when making a career choice or re-focusing your career goals.

 

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Sustainable Careers for Women


by Oriane Casale

“The green economy rewards innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurism. New ways of thinking about everyday products, processes, and services make for great opportunities for women to not only find new jobs, but also turn their ideas into businesses and create jobs for others.” Do you see yourself in this quote? If so, you might want to check out a few resources that are now available.

 

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Minnesota Women in the Labor Force – Part 2: What Do They Do?


by Rachel Vilsack

A previous post highlighted the important role that women play in Minnesota’s labor market—from their record participation in the labor force to how the recession impacted women’s employment. One key piece in this discussion is the differences between the industries and occupations in which Minnesota women and men work.

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Minnesota Women in the Labor Force – Part 1: An Introduction


by Rachel Vilsack

If you follow business trends, you might already know that Minnesota has some of the hardest-working women in the country. The labor force participation rate of women averaged 67 percent in 2010, eight percent higher than the national average, according to data (.pdf) produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Only two states – Nebraska and North Dakota – had a higher women’s labor force participation rate in 2010.

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The Art of the Possible


by Tom Melander

I love a good success story. But there’s one type of success story I’m tired of hearing. It’s the story about the really successful person “giving it all up” to become…drum roll, please…a really successful person doing something else. Like the story I saw on Oprah once, where a young Harvard graduate left his highly prized job in New York City to start a business based on his passion for cupcakes. I’m sorry, but I’m neither amazed nor inspired to find out that a Harvard graduate could start a successful bakery.

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What Women Need to Know about Salaries


by Teri Fritsma

There may be some skeptics out there, but the data is clear: women, on average, still earn less than men.  Sex differences in education, experience, and career choices can explain some of the gap, but not all of it.  For example, take just college graduates who work full-time.  Men’s median weekly wages are $1,243, while women’s are $932 for women (see this chart for the data).  And this graphic (based on data from the 2007 Current Population Survey) shows that women earn less even when they work in the same occupation as men.  Here in Minnesota, women make about 80 cents for every dollar men earn.  (That’s an unadjusted figure that doesn’t take into account sex differences in education, experience, career choices, etc.)

 

The pay gap has shrunk significantly over the past 30 years.  Still, these days even a small pay gap has big implications for families.  For the first time ever, women are on the verge of outnumbering men in the labor force.  And while it’s not new for women to work, what is new is that many women are finding themselves in the role of breadwinner.  Men have been much more likely than women to lose their jobs during this recession (especially here in Minnesota).  

 

If you’re a female (or male) job seeker, here are some tips to help you get the highest salary you can.

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